DIY

DIY Wine Bottle Label & Flash Card Gift Tag for Teacher’s Gifts

DIY Wine Label For Teacher's Gifts

 

The end of the school year is upon us!!! We all know what that means : trying to come up with cute, meaningful, and inexpensive ways to thank our incredible teachers for all that they do for our tiny humans. I knew pretty early on (even though I procrastinated making them until the night before Kinder graduation) that I wanted to give my son’s teachers a nice bottle of wine and a monogrammed mason jar for sipping it in but I couldn’t find any pre-made printable labels on Pinterest that captured the essence of my son 🙂

So, I made my own! Here is a really easy and quick tutorial for those of you wanting to make your personalized wine bottle label & a spelling flashcard gift tag.

 

Supplies : 

-Bottle of wine (I picked a moderately priced good wine that I love and I know tastes yummy! No $2 Chuck for our amazing teachers!)

-Avery shipping labels (or printer paper and spray adhesive/glue stick)

-Color Printer

-Pretty ribbon

-Card stock of any color

-Hole punch

-Scissors

-Twine or string (very thin)

 

If you are slightly crafty and enjoy wine, you may even have everything you need laying around your house. Ok, let’s get started!

1. Go to PicMonkey.com

This is an awesome photo editing and design site that is free! You can pay $4.99/month and get access to a bunch of really neat features but to keep to our inexpensive theme, just use the basic features. From the Home Page, choose “Design”, then “Custom Size”, and enter 1000 x 1500 pixels and click “Make It”. Most wine labels are around 4×5 inches but you can always trim it down to size. I had to trim off some of the border and they still turned out really cute. I’m not that great with measurements, especially when converting them from on the computer screen to real life tangible item.

Tutorial 1

Once you have your blank canvas, choose a frame to go around the border of your label. I went with the classic “Museum Matte”.

2. Choose Your Text

For our label I wanted to keep it clean and classic so that our son’s picture would really stand out. I chose the fonts Lobster Two, Amatic Small Caps, and Lavanderia which are all fonts that PicMonkey allows you to use for free. If you are a Silhouette user (or just a font addict like Meg & I) PicMonkey will also pick up any fonts you have downloaded to your computer and let you use them as well. Just type out your text and center and resize them on your label making sure to leave enough room for the picture we’ll upload in a moment. If you forget to leave room or are unsure about how much room to leave, PicMonkey is completely user friendly and let’s you edit and rearrange everything at every point in the design process.

Tutorial 2

 

3. Upload your picture

My little guy and I had a 5 minute photoshoot where I asked him to channel a favorite animal and he chose a dinosaur, naturally! I thought about having a nice posed, smiley picture but that really didn’t capture the essence of my little guy’s spirit. I had already previously edited just the photo in PicMonkey to clean up the exposure and add a little bit of a fade to the edges – this may be something you need to do as well if your photo needs it. When you’re ready for the photo, click “Overlays” and “Your Own” to upload it and add it to the label.

Tutorial 3

 

4. Adjust & Print!

Make sure all your text is perfectly centered and sized and save your project! You can print these out on Avery Shipping Labels  (#18126 with 2 labels per sheet) or print them out on regular printer paper, ensuring you print 2 images on one sheet so they are sized appropriately. This took a bit of tweaking with my own printer so play around with the settings. If you’re using the shipping labels I suggest doing a test print on regular paper first to ensure it prints the images correctly before wasting the fancy labels.

Now that you have your image printed, all you do it stick it on the bottle! You can remove the label that is already on the bottle by soaking it in some water and then rubbing the label with coconut oil or olive oil to remove the adhesive….. or you can just go the lazy route like me and stick the new label right over the old one! If you printed your label on regular paper, make sure the wine bottle is room temperature and hasn’t been chilled – you don’t want any condensation leaking through your label and making a mess of the paper & ink. Spray the back of your label with spray adhesive or a glue stick, whatever you have, and then adhere. Top with a pretty bow and you’re done!!!

 

DIY Wine Label

Of course I couldn’t stop there. I never can. I needed to add something…. teachery. That’s a word, right? So I decided to whip up a cute “W is for Wine” Spelling Flashcard to take it over the top. But instead of showing you how to do it, I thought I would just supply you with an easy printable! I adjusted my printer so it would print 4 images on one sheet of paper (think gift tag size) and then printed on some natural colored card stock for a rustic touch. Use a hole punch and twine or very thin string to secure to your bottle and then top with your ribbon. All his teachers swooned over this bottle and I know this gift will be a hit with your kid’s teachers too! Enjoy!W is for WINE W is for WINE Flashcard Gift Tag

Do you DIY gifts for your kid’s teachers? Or do you dominate this time of year with amazing gift cards? Share your DIY gifts with us on Facebook or in the comments below. We’d love to see them!

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6 thoughts on “DIY Wine Bottle Label & Flash Card Gift Tag for Teacher’s Gifts

  1. THANK YOU…THANK YOU…THANK YOU!!! This is so awesome!!! Your step by step was perfect as well!! DIY’ing made easy….my fave!!! =)

    Like

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